Archive for the 'Politicians' Category

I wrote this in June of 2010, not long after the published apology from Britain. It was a hard time in those days, and the events and the handling of those events have only made the chasm wider over the years. This apology, I think, was a good first step in the right direction for both countries to come to a peaceable impasse. It was however, several years late in the coming. – BS

 

Bloody Sunday Monument

Broken bottles under children’s feet
Bodies strewn across the dead end streets
But I won’t heed the battle call
It puts my back up, puts my back up against the wall

Sunday, Bloody Sunday

U2, Bloody Sunday

January 30, 1972
The Bogside area of Derry, in Northern Ireland.
On one side over 15,000 civil rights protesters against British rule.
On the other, British Para’s, the cream of the British Army.

In the outcome over 27 people shot, and 14 dead.

This was the time of Troubles in Ireland.

“… it is expedient that a Tribunal be established for inquiring into a definite matter of urgent public importance, namely the events on Sunday 30th January 1972 which led to loss of life in connection with the procession in Londonderry on that day, taking account of any new information relevant to events on that day”

Resolution of the House of Commons, 30th January 1998,
and of the House of Lords, 2nd February 1998

The world has changed since those days. Do not take this apology lightly my peers. Let us not return to those days of Belfast and yon. There need be no violence on this day. The point is made. They have admitted their errs. Use it to your advantage and push, politically, diplomatically for the freedom you have fought for.

But if we’ve learned one thing in these past years, is that bloodshed never washes away bloodshed.

Be better than that.

Be Irish.

A tribute to the victims:

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I made some folks who I think highly of, and respect pretty angry today on Facebook.

I’m not happy about it. I’m hoping they’ll forgive me. Or at least understand where I am coming from. I mean no ill will.

I respect their position. They are just one of the countless folks who are directly suffering from the government shut down. The one that the rest of the population, myself included, are unaffected by.

I know that folks are out of work. I know that they don’t want to lose their homes or not pay their bills. I also know that the rest of the country doesn’t care.

Make no mistake, I do care.

But I also know that until the rest of the population is affected, until the people who make the policy are affected, then those folks who are going without a check will continue to be used as political pawns in a game that none of us have skin in.

I know that the American people have become, well, simply put, lazy. Our government knows this. They won a Presidential election on it. The American motto should be “What handout can I get today?” John F Kennedy had it all wrong. “Ask what your country can do for you!” He obviously had a teleprompter foul up. 

I don’t want my friends to lose their home. I truly don’t.

Hell, I don’t want to lose my own home.

But neither do I want the status quo to continue. Earlier today I wrote

“Let me clarify my position on this. Until it hurts, and I mean truly hurts everyone involved, these types of political games will continue. Until the “ruling class” is affected because the populace refuses to fund a government that is nonoperational, until the “ruling class” doesn’t receive a check, until the streets stop being paved, and the system teeters on collapse these types of grandstands will continue to occur and interrupt our lives. Because, from my view, they want us dependent upon them. They want us to need them. They want us unable to get by without feeding it, the machine, the bureaucracy. So I want it to hurt. I want a black flag policy. Jackson once said “If the general government should persist in the measures now threatened, there must be war. It is painful enough to discover with what unconcern they speak of war and threaten it. They do not know its horrors. I have seen enough of it to make me look upon it as the sum of all evils” referring to the Civil War. This is really no different from my point of view. The government threatens, it soothes, it shakes its fist, but it has no impact on the makers of the policy. Until those policy makers feel the pain, until they stop being served their coffee, stop having the Secret Service to protect them, and stop having their world catered to them on our dime, then the status quo will never change. And I mean never.”

That’s pretty much my thought in a nutshell.

Right or wrong. Lambast me. Hate me. The fact is I have little hope for America anymore. I don’t believe we will ever see a populace rising to meet the challenges of our future the way we have seen in the past. I see our rights being stricken what seems like daily. I see our dependency on our government quadrupling almost daily.

So no, I don’t want anyone to lose their home. But neither do I want our world, our country to continue the way it is. I can’t pick a position and win in this gambit. A wise man would keep his mouth shut, and probably I should. I’m royally sick of seeing folks like my friends being used as Yo-Yo’s in political strategy however. I’ve never been happier to be out of the US of military until these last few years, and I could never dream of a day saying that prior to this.

Will this shutdown change anything? Probably not. It never has before.

Most likely before the week is out they’ll have a budget passed, the Healthcare program will be included, no one will lose their home, and this chance to make a notable change will vanish in to thin air. Folks will rant and rave about Obamacare and post angry pictures on Facebook deriding our current government, President and their ilk. None of it will change.

Because the ones who make the policy don’t care. The ones who argue and write the policy don’t care. The ones who make the red-tape don’t go through it. They will  just generate another few thousand dollar per plate fundraisers and get reelected on misinformation and political lies like they did the last time.  So until their lives are interrupted, until their lives are affected, none of this matters. Until Amendment 28 is ratified and passed, this is all just parlor games. A New Orleans street card vendor trick.

They just want to show us, what happens when they don’t get their way.

So why aren’t I blogging more?

Well, honestly I’m fed up. I’m tired. I’m worn out.

With the knowledge that the Federal government is looking to do the largest land grab regulation since the aquisition of Alaska, I’m forced to ask some hard questions. Especially since it directly affects me

Is this the Union for which five generations of my family including myself, went to the Army for?

The answer is decidedly no.

The country we joined the service for did not use drones or spy on its citizens, and certainly not for profit.  Something that the British citizenry are rapidly begining to dislike in their own country.

The country we served, did not lambast religious education systems of any form, especially while its own education system is continually outperformed by that same criticized system daily.

The country we served did not violate the rights of a land owner….something that I thought we straightened out in 1776, but apparently some folks have forgotten.

The country we served, encouraged people to earn their way, to make something of themselves, and to work for success not create a leach class that sucks the financial ability from all of the others.  You earn it.

The country we served, did not allow others to determine thehealth care one got. It was up to the individual. You got what you could pay for. It wasn’t given. You earn it. Like everything else.

The country we served allowed anyone to go to college, provided you earned it. Not cut funding for college for soldiers who have been fighting, dying and getting injured to earn their degree versus sneaking across a border, illegally at night.

The country we served did not reward criminals, or those who knowingly broke the law.

In short I don’t know this country any more.

And I’m not sure I like it anymore either.

But sadly until folks decide to do more than “Like” a silly status on Facebook, it’s all just words.

The American people have become lazy. Sloven even. With no desire to change anything. The antipathy is a cancerous disease of self preservation that prevents any action by anybody. Instead we stand like lemmings in the room each staring at the other wondering who will make the first move.

Meanwhile the bulldozer just keeps coming.

The fact is, we embarass our forefather. We have shamed them. We are willing to let everything go, just so we can have our highspeed internet and high definition television programming. We are willing to subjugate, so that we can get a government check, a government benefit, a government handout because of all the things we could fear, the country that put a man on the moon….suddenly fears work.

Sadly, I fear this ideaology may be right….at least to some poor bastard.

 

We have politically corrected ourself in to oblivion. We can’t accept an apology and move on with our lives. We have to have blood for some social injustice while our government trashed our other social rights behind our backs.

We have become a nation of television, sound byte fed attention defecit children with no desire or care for the larger picture if it doesn’t meet some latest fad thats been identified as Good for the Children ™.

And frankly, it all makes me want to vomit.

So will I be blogging with any regularity?

Possibly. Maybe. Doubtful.

But I moved into the boondocks for peace and quiet.

I don’t intend to be spied on by a government that I once worked for under some silly notion of “Greater Good.”

Do your damn job more effeciently and stop passing laws to make it  harder to put the bad guys behind bars or in the ground. Novel concept. The fact that Nidal Hasan is still breathing air in the same time zone I am is proof enough that this country has lost its marbles, and its balls.

But thats too hard. Its much easier to pass the buck than it is to be responsible. Everyones worried about some bullshit legacy or history book consideration. Everyone ants to be a star.

And nobody wants to do their fucking job.

 

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Are we on the verge of a second Korean War? Maybe, maybe not. It’s hard to say with North Korea, whose leadership system and propaganda machine portrays their leaders like demigods (Such as his awe-inspiring 11 hole in ones upon playing golf for the first time ever in his entire life…or maybe thats smell inspiring). Predicting North Korea falls in to 2 basic categories:

  • Boating and threatening- This will continue until China reaches from around the curtain and drags them back stage whereupon they smack them in the head while saying “Nice Doggie” until they halt.
  • Hot war – Playtime is over.

I notice a lot of folks from my generation, the so called Generation X, asking “Why are we there? Why are we sticking our nose in it?”

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You have power over your mind – not outside events. Realize this, and you will find strength.
Marcus Aurelius

So some folks got what they wanted last night and some folks didn’t. Such is the way of the world and the nature of the beast.

I won’t sit here and try to ploy niceties and say I think under this leadership we are heading in anything even vaguely considerable to the right direction.

But nor will I quibble over it.

What I am concerned about is a much more conscionable change in our culture as a whole.

Any one of these alone, ten years ago, would have shown a government official the door. But in this day and age not a single thing has been done on any of them.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not happy with the outcome, but I am more concerned over our populaces willingness to forgo these slights against itself.

Rather we have created entire generations whom are dependent upon the government.  I’ll be exploring this more in coming days but historically speaking it’s a scary trend for our nation.

 

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I don’t wax on politics as much as I used too.

But the power of voting can not be understated.

One thing I absolutely despise is apathy. Tell me you don’t like the choices. Tell me you don’t feel they represent you, just don’t tell me that you are not going to use the blood paid right that hundreds of thousands of people from the Revolutionary War to present day died to give you.

Back in 2004 I wrote that voting is effectively making a choice as to the type of world you want you and your children to live in.

Specifically

We, as a race see many things in our life that our children will never see. But in their time we must remember that they too, will see changes.

What those changes are, will be decided not only by our actions, but by our stances we choose, and the votes we place on our elected officials in November.

It is easy to cast responsibility to someone else. To say it is up to our government. It is up to our leaders. it is up to our neighbors. It is not my job.

We delude ourselves with that thought.

I don’t care who you vote for. I just care that you go vote. Make a legitimate decision regarding your life.

Instead of approaching it as “If it happens it happens” impose your will on your own destiny.

But don’t sit on the sidelines. Don’t be apathetic.

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So Dana Loesch has written a pretty scathing article of Brad Lager over at Breibart.com.

I know this because I, in turn, received a scathing E-mail from Mr Lager about those damn “unfactual bloggers”.

I’m not surprised. She’s good at that sort of thing and I have a lot of respect for her. I’m also not surprised at getting E-mails from a campaign that I A) am not following B) didn’t ask to receive E-mails from and C) have not even the remotest interest in the candidate in question.

I’ve been rooting for Pete Kinder ever since he forked over his own money to fight the healthcare law. That takes balls in my book, and his stance on illegal immigration is well known in these parts.  Besides that, frankly I’d take Barney the Purple Dragon over Claire McCaskill.

I will openly admit to knowing very little about Brad Lager and frankly what I do know I don’t care for.  Don’t take anything I say at value. I am a “nonfactual blogger” according to Mr. Lager.

Go view his voting record yourself.

My pet peeve? In 2006 Lager voted against  restricting the use of Eminent Domain.

And then he voted to expand it’s use to take help the government take our properties away from us.

He voted to expand abortion laws.

He voted to keep criminals out of prison.

But you don’t have to take my word for it. It’s all right there in black and white.

Just remember I’m not factual, and neither are any other bloggers out here. For the record, while Kinder isn’t spotless his record is much more solidly in my decision process frankly.

Frankly I didn’t have a dog in this hunt, and haven’t written one whit about it until i saw that “unfactual blogger” bit. It really torques my jaws when I see these silly half-assed lawyers degrade folks who are at the fore front of grass root operations.

You can see our retort to Mr Lager and his fine staff after the jump.

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Fire works.

Pretty are they not?

A spectacular show those whom have not experienced the horrors of war. A simulation of the explosions, the roar, and the crackle of fire in the night. But Stinger missiles do not blast in shades of red white and blue, and phosphorus is a white that is blindingly bright that almost burns the eyes while it lights the night sky.

What have we become?

What have we done?

“The strength of the Constitution lies entirely in the determination of each citizen to defend it. Only if every single citizen feels duty bound to do his share in this defense are the constitutional rights secure.”
― Albert Einstein

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When ever  I can I like to publish communications for my local representatives. With no further adieu here is our semi regular contribution from David Sater

 

The legislative session is wrapping up in this final week of session. Going in to the last day of session, the House and Senate passed just over 70 bills with one day to go. That is 70 out of over 1,000 bills filed. I sometimes wonder about working months on a piece of legislation and then in the last two weeks, one Senator or one person in Leadership in the House decide to table your bill. But, it is always better to error on the side of caution than to pass something that might be more harmful than good.

A piece of legislation that was of great concern to local businesses and county government was House Bill 1329. A month or so ago, a judge decided that county and local sales tax on vehicles and boats purchased out of state could not be collected when the car or boat was titled at the license bureau. These taxes have been collected for more years than I can remember. Already, car and boat dealers from out of state are advertising the savings a Missouri resident would get if they purchased the vehicle or boat from their out of state dealership. This bill would simply reinstate the sales tax that has been in existence for many, many years. Without this, Barry County may not have any local car or auto dealerships in the future. It also places a huge hole in the County`s budget of over $20,000 per month. The bill has passed the House and Senate, but we do not know what the Governor is going to do. He has made comments about a possible veto.

There’s good news and bad news on my individual legislative efforts. This “good news/bad news” scenario affects all legislators. I was able to get my small grain dealer bill through, which changes the amount a grain producer can purchase and produce from $100,000 per year to 50,000 bushels. This was needed because the price of corn has increased the last few years from less than $2.00 a bushel to over $6.00 a bushel. This bill will help our local small grain dealer in Exeter.

I was one out of two on pharmacy bills. My success was changing the statutes to allow pharmacies in Missouri to purchase prescription drugs from out of state pharmacies. Previously, the out of state pharmacies had to be licensed by Missouri. Now they do not, because credentialing in all states is basically the same. This enables the free market to work to transfer drugs from one pharmacy to another. This happens when a pharmacy has one patient on an expensive drug and the patient moves away or has their regimen changed to another drug. The pharmacy is then stuck with a product that might be very expensive. The bad news is that my pro-life/pro-business bill that simply stated that a pharmacy has the right to stock whatever product they want without governmental interference did not make it through the Senate. We will get it done next year.

There was some fear this year that funding for the Missouri Veterans Homes would be cut. We found some money by giving them the casino admission fees they originally received prior to 1998. Under this provision, our veterans homes will receive an additional $30 million dollars which is enough money to keep our homes open and viable for years to come. This will now be a steady funding stream.

Contact me anytime by calling me at my home in Cassville (417/847-4661) or my Capitol office (573/751-1480). Thanks for letting me serve.

Best Regards,

David Sater

68th District

866/485-0759

 

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Our regular contribution From Missouri State Representative David Sater

 

Special session, when will it end? It could last until November 15th, 2011, but it should not. As I mentioned in a previous report, it is costing you around $25 thousand dollars a day for us to be in session.

 

Two weeks ago, the Senate and House passed two pieces of legislation. The Missouri Science and Reinvestment Act encourages investments in science and technology companies in Missouri. We repealed a provision of a new law that prohibits teachers from using sites such as Facebook to privately message students. The Legislature and the Governor thought this was a good idea, at the time, but freedom of speech was a concern. Our mission in this law was to keep our school children safe from teachers that acted badly. The Governor will sign both of these bills.

 

Last week we met for a few days to discuss an economic bill. We were in caucus last Wednesday to see if there was enough support for the bill. I try and keep in good contact with my senator, Jack Goodman, and three other senators in Southwest Missouri. They told me before caucus that our bill in the House was dead on arrival and they would not endorse it. In caucus, I mentioned that since the bill we were discussing would probably not go anywhere, it sure took away from some good crappie fishing. It got a laugh, but the point was made. House leadership is still insistent we pass the bill and send it to the Senate.

 

The key pieces of this bill are incentives to attract new businesses and jobs in Missouri. I still believe that government should not be in the business of creating jobs, the private sector does a much better job. Anyway, this bill would offer tax incentives to attract amateur sporting events in Missouri and encourage the creation of data storage centers. The bill would also create the Missouri Export Act, which creates incentives for exporting Missouri products – such as pork products. The bill would provide funding for job training and create a fund to both retain companies that are considering leaving Missouri and attract businesses that are looking for a new location. An amendment added to the bill on the House floor would reduce Missouri`s corporate income tax from 6.25 percent to 5.5 percent. The tax would be offset by savings generated by reforms to existing tax credit programs. We decreased the Historical Preservation Tax Credit by $28 million per year, decreased the RemediationTax Credit per year (Brownfield Redevelopment Program) by $17.5 million, and the Low Income Housing Tax Credit by $32 million dollars. We also kept a no sunset condition, which means it continues without reauthorization, on the Historical and Low Income Tax Credits. We took off the sunset, which is usually 4 or 5 years, on the Food Pantry and Pregnancy Resource Tax Credits. In the bill, there was also a provision that the Legislature would review any tax credit program by September 1st of the calendar year prior to the sunset of the program to analyze the effectiveness of the program and to see if the money we are giving these programs is worthwhile.

 

I was able to get one amendment through on the House floor. There is a new tax credit program for the Development Disability Care Providers which was in this legislation. I noticed that it did not have a cap on the amount to be given out. I added an amendment to cap the tax credits $5 million dollars per year. According to my conversations with leadership, this was an omission and they welcomed the amendment.

 

As mentioned, probably all of this could of waited another three months for the regular session that starts the first of January. But this was the Governor’s call and by law we have to attend.

 

The Governor will be in Springfield at Missouri State University on October 14 for a ceremony that celebrates the start of a UMKC-Missouri State Pharmacy Program at Missouri State. They will be able to graduate 25 to 30 students from Missouri State with a degree in Pharmacy. This will help southwest Missouri in the shortage of pharmacists. I have been invited to attend because I placed the money in the budget for the program this year. I attempted it in 2010 and it did not stay, but this year there was enough support to keep it in the budget.

 

Hopefully this will give you an explanation of the legislative process. If you have any questions, call me at my home in Cassville (417/847-4661) or my Capitol office (573/751-1480). Thanks for letting me serve you.

 

xxx

 

 

Best Regards,

David Sater

68th District

866/485-0759

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This article started as a paper for one of my college classes on research, as such it has APA style references etc which I have included at the end of the article for your own bemusement.  I have expounded upon the original story a great deal, as the subject matter is interesting. I draw no conclusions as to the vile of the Project itself. I leave that to the reader.  Sorry it took me so long to get it done! – BloodSpite

From the early 1950’s until the late 1960’s the Central Intelligence Agency in two countries (The US and Canada) conducted a long running series of experiments under auspicious heading Project MKULTRA. Due the clandestine nature of the project, much of the research material has been lost or destroyed; although over 20,000 pages of material were recovered in 1975.

Some 2 years ago, the Senate Health Subcommittee heard chilling testimony about the human experimentation activities of the Central Intelligence Agency. The Deputy Director of the CIA revealed that over 30 universities and institutions were involved in an ‘extensive testing and experimentation’ program which included covert drug tests on unwitting citizens ‘at all social levels, [high and low], native Americans and foreign.’ Several of these [tests involved] the administration of LSD to ‘unwitting subjects in [social] situations.’ … The Central Intelligence Agency drugged American citizens without their knowledge or consent. It used university facilities and personnel without their knowledge.” – Senator Edward Kennedy, 1977

Numerous leading scientists and world leaders were part of the program, including former Canadian World Psychiatric Association chairperson Dr. Donald Cameron as well as CIA Director Richard Helms. The basis of the program was to use human experimentation with a variety of illicit drugs to identify everything from a perfected truth serum, to brainwashing and the ability to sway the decision-making process in a foreign leader.

The results were anything but what they wanted.

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Time Lines are hell. Especially when you claim to be taking decisive action in a crisis.

Take a look at this one. Look at the rhetoric each day, look at the corresponding action.

Tell me your thoughts. I know what mine are and presented them at the end.

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Once again we are privileged to offer you the regular communication from District 68 State Representative David Sater of Southwest Missouri

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Just when I started thinking we had hope for our next generations.

How lacking has our culture become that we can not read something and understand or comprehend?

How insulting is it to have our government support making a freaking comic book to explain why something they made is good?

Whether you support the Health Care Reform Act or not, in this instance is moot. The sheer audacity behind this particular publication is absolutely amazing. Essentially by this publication, the author is saying “Your too stupid to understand this. Here’s a comic book.”

Have we really fallen so low?

The scariest part is, someone will read it, and think it gospel.

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Judge Roger Vinson of Florida, appointed by the late President Ronald Reagen in 1983, ruled today that the Health Care Reform Act (sometimes called ObamaCare) was unconstitutional.

He is the second Federal Judge to do so, and his ruling helps in clearing the way to a decision that will almost absolutely end up at the foot of the Supreme Court. Unlike his Virginia counterpart Judge Henry Hudson, Judge Vinson ruled that the entire health care act should fall if the appellate courts join him in invalidating the insurance requirement.

“It is difficult to imagine that a nation which began, at least in part, as the result of opposition to a British mandate giving the East India Company a monopoly and imposing a nominal tax on all tea sold in America would have set out to create a government with the power to force people to buy tea in the first place.”….

…”For example, virtually no one can opt out of the housing market (broadly defined) and a majority of people will at some point buy a home. The vast majority of those homes will be financed with a mortgage, a large number of which (particularly in difficult economic times, as we have seen most recently) will go into default, thereby cost-shifting billions of dollars to third parties and the federal government. Should Congress thus have power under the Commerce Clause to preemptively regulate and require individuals above a certain income level to purchase a home financed with a mortgage (and secured with mortgage guaranty insurance) in order to add stability to the housing and financial markets (and to guard against the possibility of future cost-shifting because of a defaulted mortgage), on the theory that most everyone is currently, or inevitably one day will be, active in the housing market?”

From the Ruling of The Honorable Judge Roger Vinson Case 3:10-cv-00091-RV -EMT Document 150 Filed 01/31/11

Judge Vinson held that the insurance requirement exceeds the regulatory powers granted to Congress under the Commerce Clause of the Constitution. He also wrote that the provision could not be rescued by an associated clause in Article I that gives Congress broad authority to make laws “necessary and proper” to carrying out its designated responsibilities.

The federal government argued that Congress has a right to regulate the insurance market because it is unique— it’s fair to assume that every single person will need health care at one point in his or her life. If they’re not insured, their costs will have to get picked up by other consumers, driving up rates for everyone and putting them in the insurance market whether they plan to or not.

“I must reluctantly conclude that Congress exceeded the bounds of its authority in passing the act with the individual mandate. That is not to say, of course, that Congress is without power to address the problems and inequities in our health care system. The health care market is more than one-sixth of the national economy, and without doubt Congress has the power to reform and regulate this market. That has not been disputed in this case. The principal dispute has been about how Congress chose to exercise that power here,…While the individual mandate was clearly ‘necessary and essential’ to the act as drafted, it is not ‘necessary and essential’ to health care reform in general…Because the individual mandate is unconstitutional and not severable, the entire act must be declared void.”

The decision will likely face an immediate filing by the federal government for a stay, and the case is undoubtedly headed to the Supreme Court.

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Missouri State Representative David Sater has been a regular feature both here and at our sister site of Techography for a number of years.

Sadly soon that will end.

Representative Sater has reached his term limit and will be moving on to other, we hope, bigger and brighter things. A pharmacist, and native of nearby Cassville, MO he has brought a degree of honesty and integrity to the very dirty business of politics. We regret to see him go.

We will also miss his regular dispatches, and we hope to share his with you until the last.

With no further adieu, Missouri State Representative of District 68, David Sater.

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I didn’t watch it. As I noted at the Castle I did read it however. Right Wing News meanwhile has a nice rundown of others reactions.

That said I think my thoughts were best summed already by another writer, and very well:

“They say, ‘What’s your show about?’ I say, ‘Nothing.’”- Jerry Seinfeld

I was reminded of the Seinfeldian idea, the show about nothing, as I listened to the State of the Union. Don’t get me wrong, President Obama said a lot, and some of the things he said I enjoyed hearing, but ultimately it was a speech about nothing. — Karol Markowicz

Much Ado about nothing indeed.

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$755 Billion dollars.

That’s the 2009 estimate of how much we owe China in long-term debt.

And they are still buying it, just as hard as they can go.

With credit holdings totaling almost 1 Trillion dollars the idea that Dem’s think they can call Chinese leaders “dictators”, while demanding human rights in their country is to say the very least, foolish.

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