Posts Tagged 'History'

I wrote this just before my wedding. June 12, 2004 at our sister site of Techography.com. I’m republishing it here both for posterity, and because this weekend is my wife and I’s eight year anniversary. I look back now and I can see a visible difference in my writing. I can also see a difference in myself. That’s for another time, however. Bear in mind this was written several years ago so the phrasing is appropriate. I did not post that weekend. I will not be posting this one. Somethings are worth celebrating privately. -BS

Me, Circa 2004 taken by one of my best friend (and best mans) wife during our wedding.

 

History tells us that that June 23, 1865 was the date the last Confederate General Surrendered his command.

I”m afraid its just not so.

The real date is June 12, 2004.

Thats the date I surrender (I”m a former 18th Georgia Infantry Re-enactor) my freedom to a Northern born individual, a former Union Re-enactor for the 155th Irish of Western New York.

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This story was first published by myself on March 3rd 2007 at Techography. I republished it here in 2010. – BloodSpite

On Easter Monday, shortly after noon, Patrick Pearse and a band of ill armed and ill prepared poets and romantic patriots rose in rebellion took control of the General Post Office in

Click for large version

central Dublin and several other strategic sites around the city. The Irish Republic was proclaimed in Dublin, and the insurgent Tricolour suddenly broke upon startled eyes flying from the flagstaff above the General Post Office in the very heart of the Irish capital.

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Managed to get my hands on yet another good SR-71 story this week.

 

Enjoy!

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Most folks know I like Cold War stories here on the blog.

I’ve written quite a few and they are frankly probably the most popular pieces on the site.

I’ve written a couple about the SR-71. Actually, written is rather a strong word. I have republished stories, that have been written or told by the actual men who flew these ridiculously powerful machines. Mostly because I see them floating in cyberspace but never find a good single collection of them. So I enjoy doing it.

I enjoy them, as I have a child like affection for the black metal monster that borders on obsession. My first model was a Blackbird for instance.

So when I came across this story about the SR-71, I couldn’t help but add it to the slowly growing collection here.

Enjoy.

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National Famine Memorial Cuimhneachán Náisiúnta ar an n Gorta Mór in Murrisk, Connacht, in County Mayo

(I first wrote this March of 2011. I’ve reposted it this month for our Irish Heritage celebration. Enjoy! – BS)

Coffin Ships are a rather sad part of Irish history. Originating during the Great Irish Famine, and of course the prison ships to Botany Bay. The first vessel with Irish convicts for Botany Bay arrived in Port Jackson on 26 September 1791.

They were called “coffin ships,” because so many poor souls had been dying on them as of late, leaving behind widows and orphans and broken families. Typically untrustworthy vessels, these ships were purchased literally from salvage yards (where they awaiting dismantling) by unscrupulous owners who had no intention of repairing them. Sailors who agreed to serve on board these floating wrecks typically knew nothing of the dangers until they were well out at sea, vagabonds, and those desperate for work (of which there were plenty) quickly volunteered.

Concerned only with profits, these same ship owners heavily overburdened the ships then insured them against expected losses of cargo. They were quite literally worth more at the bottom of the sea than upon it.

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(I first wrote this March of 2012. Each year I try to add at least one new story to my Irish History Celebration posts. I’ve reposted it this month for our Irish Heritage celebration. Enjoy! – BS)

The Famine began quite mysteriously in September 1845 as leaves on potato plants suddenly turned black and curled, then rotted, seemingly the result of a fog that had wafted across the fields of Ireland. I have been told that the cause was actually an airborne fungus originally transported in the holds of ships traveling from North America to England. Somewhat ironic then if you consider how many Irish families in turn fled to North America because of it. Let no one say we Irish have not had a sense of humor in the annuals of history.

In Any event, The Great Famine was a period of mass starvation, disease and emigration between 1845 and 1852. Outside of Ireland it is more commonly called The Irish Potatoe Famine. Within Ireland, and amongst my own family it was referred to as an Gorta Mór or great hunger.

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Are we on the verge of a second Korean War? Maybe, maybe not. It’s hard to say with North Korea, whose leadership system and propaganda machine portrays their leaders like demigods (Such as his awe-inspiring 11 hole in ones upon playing golf for the first time ever in his entire life…or maybe thats smell inspiring). Predicting North Korea falls in to 2 basic categories:

  • Boating and threatening- This will continue until China reaches from around the curtain and drags them back stage whereupon they smack them in the head while saying “Nice Doggie” until they halt.
  • Hot war – Playtime is over.

I notice a lot of folks from my generation, the so called Generation X, asking “Why are we there? Why are we sticking our nose in it?”

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So its finally March. Usually my favorite time of the year.

As you can see I managed to ensure that the website changed to its typical green hue for the occasion, forests of Ireland a backdrop for something I have done on this website for several years: that of sharing some Irish history, Mythology, lore and my own families history with you.

This year has been crazy, and the last several weeks hectic. Last year our March celebration was marred by the loss of longtime friend and fellow MilBlogger Lex.

I can’t promise you this month will be better. There are things moving in m own life that have me as worried as a long tail cat in a room full of rocking chairs, but I digress.

It’s March. There is still snow on the ground. Spring is coming soon as the last vestiges of winter make their way from our lives for this year.

Smile.

Be Happy.

Be Green!

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It’s March again.

I wanted to write this post earlier this week and have it prepped. Unfortunately I’ve been sick the vast majority of the week and frankly anything aside from my eyelids has been a painful undertaking these last several days.

That aside, March has been a special time of the year for this website since its inception.

Long time readers know that every March we turn the page green with the woods of Ireland, and our pages are graced with myth, history and stories about the green isle.

It’s with this 1st of March that I am happy to again paint out pages green, and put forth stories both new and old from previous years to help share the wonder that is being Irish, and Ireland.

I try not to take to much a political vein in my posts, I love Ireland for what it is, what it was, and what it can be. My family left its shore many years ago and I make no denials that many current Irishman would consider me a “Plastic Paddy”. That does not diminish my efforts, or my desire to give some under standings to the struggles our people have been through, or the legends that we were given.

That said join us won’t you? As we celebrate the green month once again, and another year of being Irish, in America!

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This article being updated regularly (sometimes as often as several times a minute at current) Please hit your refresh button regularly to see the latest updates at the bottom of the page.

Earthquake and Tsunami Hits Japan and the Pacific Region

The first sign of a tsunami arriving is the water pulling away from the coastline. It’s being reported Diamond Head Reef is now exposed -@TWCBreaking

Here is a link to the Arrival Times

Since BloodSpite and I are extremely busy today, here is a Live News Feed to keep you abreast:

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

We’ll be updating this throughout the day. Please check the jump for latest updates. Follow us on Twitter for up to the minute reports from sources including the Pacific Tsunami Center, US Military, and NOAA.

We’ll do the work so you don’t have too.

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Every March our long term readers know that things get a little more….green around here. We also focus about 90% of our article writing to all things Irish.

With that in mind, we have written about literally countless subjects on Ireland, including music, politics, and even my own family history.

What we’d like to know is: whats something you want to learn about Ireland? Is there something you’d like us to research, and write about this March?

Give us some feedback, drop some ideas in the comments. Consider us your personal researchers this March. We’ll do the leg work and the writing, you do the reading and suggesting.

Also don’t forget that St. Patrick’s Day is the date for our annual blog meet. It will be held at our traditional location of Celtic Grill in Bentonville, Arkansas. We have held this blogmeet for going on 7 years running, and it’s still going strong. So be sure to RSVP with us so we can meet, drink and be merry!

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This is a 2 part article, written by both authors of Registered Evil. As many things in our history, different people, were in different places with different perspectives. These are ours. -BS

Challenger: 25 years later, Still a Painful Memory.

January 28, 1989…

Seems like a long time ago…I remember it vividly though.

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This is a 2 part article, written by both authors of Registered Evil. As many things in our history, different people, were in different places with different perspectives. These are ours. Part 2 is here. -BS

The Challenger lifting off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Click for Hi Res)

January 28, 1986.

I was attending Elementary school in Virginia Beach, VA. My dad was stationed at NAS Oceana, and we lived in Pungo, VA at the time. Nanny Creek Rd I think. The whole address escapes me now.

My teacher, Mrs Paxton I believe her name was, had rolled a TV in our classroom to watch the shuttle lift off. 3rd grade was cool like that then. I’m a young buck, I know.

As most school systems were at the time, they were excited that a teacher had been selected to go in to space: Christa McAuliffe.

How many dreams started, and ended that day?

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Amongst those of us who are in telecommunications, America has two tower icons.

However, one will end up in the junk yard this week and the other might gain national prominence and be assured longevity.

For those located in Hawaii, or in Tennessee both are landmarks that are easily remembered and well known.

The Honolulu TV Tower has been a landmark since 1962

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I originally posted this back in 2004 at Techography. It’s short and sweet, like all Thanksgiving posts should be in my opinion. The time isn’t one for waxing eloquent, or long drawn out speeches. Its one for reflection. – BS

I could try to write something poetic. I could try to write something intriguing, in depth and hammering, tear jerking or maybe even emotional.

I’ll leave it to Doc Russia and the rest to write serious pieces.

Instead I’ll let someone else’s words fit the bill for me this Thanksgiving.
More after the Jump

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In the military, sometimes the line between you and the life you have is a thread. That thread can mean the difference in life and death. The difference between success and failure. Outright jubilation and utter tragedy.

Threads are funny things. We can hang by them, or be hung by them. Caught up and tangled in them or have them cut us loose in a instant.

There’s often no rhyme or reason to those threads or their actions. I do not think I have ever met a military veteran who does not believe in luck to some degree or another.

No matter how religious one may or may not be, sometimes there is just no other explanation. Guardian angels, luck, it’s all the same ball of wax.

Occasionally though, the stories are all to surreal, to amazing to not be given a lot of thought on later in life.

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My Family has served this country for over three generations.

Today is our day.

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Yeah these are usually in v00d3ws purview but this song has been in my head for over two days.

It’s an excellent song with a good historical basis.

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